Tag Archives: After Aristotle

Number and Reality 2. Towards a Philosophy of Mathematics Bibliography

[This post is an exact replacement for the now deleted “Number and Reality 3.” One should not, I think we can all agree, have “Number and Reality 3” immediately succeed “Number and Reality 1” in a series devoted to number … Continue reading

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Number and Reality 1. Some Initial Questions and the Initial Question

1. In the immediately previous post, I observed that I now find myself enjoying the leisure that will allow me “to engage in some serious thinking in the philosophy of mathematics.” More specifically, I announced my intention “to begin the … Continue reading

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Number and Reality 0. An Introduction to a Project in the Philosophy of Mathematics

1. At long last I find myself enjoying a set of circumstances that will allow me to engage in some serious thinking in the philosophy of mathematics; the two September posts, “Ontological Arithmetic. One Realistic Foot in the Door of … Continue reading

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Logic Matters

The present post is a follow-up to my post of September 23, 2020, “Alfred Tarski on the Benefits of the Knowledge of Logic. A Timely Reminder.” In the post I presented a passage written by the logician, Alfred Tarki, spelling … Continue reading

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Ontological Arithmetic. The Second Foot in the Door

Greetings. In the immediately previous post, the “Ontological Arithmetic. One Realistic Foot in the Door of the Philosophy of Mathematics” of September 24, 2020, I said that in the present post I would “spell out how one can prove, demonstrate, … Continue reading

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Ontological Arithmetic. One Realistic Foot in the Door of the Philosophy of Mathematics

The aim of the present post is three-fold. I wish first to draw attention to the ontological theory of identity, i.e., of existents as identical with existents, and three quite basic principles of the theory. I then wish to then … Continue reading

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Reflecting on Russell’s Religion and Science 3. Russell as a Skeptic, Even with Respect to Science

1. The present post is the third in a series of posts reflecting on the philosophical theses at work in Bertrand Russell’s Religion and Science.* In the series’ previous posts, I have directed attention to Russell’s “exclusivist epistemological scientism,” as … Continue reading

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Reflecting on Russell’s Religion and Science 2. Its Scientism Confirmed and Two Complications Raised

1. The present post is the second in a series of posts reflecting on the philosophical theses at work in Bertrand Russell’s Religion and Science.* In the series’ opening post, I did three things pertinent to the present one. First, … Continue reading

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Reflecting on Russell’s Religion and Science 1. Scientism and the Four Purported Magisteria

1. One reason why I have not been posting over the past months is because I have been caught up in the teaching of courses new to me, in ethics, medical ethics, and environmental ethics. These having been courses for … Continue reading

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Non-contradiction, Divine Omnipresence, and Dual Citizenship

1. Good Aristotelian that I am, or at least neo-Aristotelian, I introduce and make use of the principle of non-contradiction, that No being can both be and not be, in the same respect and at the same time. in virtually … Continue reading

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